Screen Queen by Lori Goldstein Blog Tour (Review)

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June 18th

June 19th

Moonlight Rendezvous – Review + Favourite Quotes
The Reading Corner for All – Review + Favourite Quotes
Young Adult Media Consumer – Review + Favourite Quotes
Devouring Books – Review
Confessions of a YA Reader – Promotional Post

June 20th

Snark and Squee – Review
Wall-to-wall books – Review

June 21st

The Hermit Librarian – Interview
Book-Keeping – Review + Favourite Quotes
A Few Chapters ’til Love – Review + Dream Cast
Hauntedbybooks – Review + Favourite Quotes

June 22nd

L.M. Durand – Review + Favourite Quotes
Magical Reads – Review + Playlist
Kait Plus Books – Review + Favourite Quotes
Musings of a (Book) Girl – Review + Favourite Quotes
Pooled Ink – Promotional Post

June 23rd

The YA Obsessed – Review
Belle’s Archive – Review
Frayed Books – Review
Firstbooklove – Review
Dazzled by Books – Review + Favourite Quotes

June 24th

Morgan Vega – Review + Playlist + Favourite Quotes
The Clever Reader – Review + Favourite Quotes
Bookish In Bed – Review
Mind of Luxe – Review
Kourtni Reads – Review + Favourite Quotes

Goodreads Summary:

Three thousand applicants. An acceptance rate of two percent. A dream internship for the winning team. ValleyStart is the most prestigious high school tech incubator competition in the country. Lucy Katz, Maddie Li, and Delia Meyer have secured their spots. And they’ve come to win.

Meet the Screen Queens.

Lucy Katz was born and raised in Palo Alto, so tech, well, it runs in her blood. A social butterfly and CEO in-the-making, Lucy is ready to win and party.

East Coast designer, Maddie Li left her home and small business behind for a summer at ValleyStart. Maddie thinks she’s only there to bolster her graphic design portfolio, not to make friends.

Delia Meyer taught herself how to code on a hand-me-down computer in her tiny Midwestern town. Now, it’s time for the big leagues–ValleyStart–but super shy Delia isn’t sure if she can hack it (pun intended).

When the competition kicks off, Lucy, Maddie, and Delia realize just how challenging the next five weeks will be. As if there wasn’t enough pressure already, the girls learn that they would be the only all-female team to win ever. Add in one first love, a two-faced mentor, and an ex-boyfriend turned nemesis and things get…complicated.

Filled with humor, heart, and a whole lot of girl power, Screen Queens is perfect for fans of Morgan Matson, Jenny Han, and The Bold Type.

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

My rating: 4/5 stars

My Thoughts:

The minute I read that this book was perfect for fans of “perfect for fans of Morgan Matson, Jenny Han, and The Bold Type.” I knew I had to pick this beauty up. Paired with the fact it was about women navigating the male dominating tech world, I could already sense that this was going to be an epic read. Screen Queens certainly didn’t disappoint and delivered on the fronts that drew me in initially.

While I struggled to get into the book at first, once I got a feel for the writing style ad the different POVS, I was hooked. This story has the classic formula of a group of people who are forced to worked together and despise each other, but as the stakes become higher, they start o bond and realize that working together isn’t as bad as they had thought.  It’s a trope that I really love, and it was done quite well in this book. I really liked seeing their dynamic evolve throughout the book, and see them go from enemies to friends. Individually, they were all really strong and complex characters and together they truly thrived. One thing that I would have liked to see just a little more was them just hanging out because while we did get to see them work together as a team we didn’t get to see them just hang out, quite as much. I think one or two more scenes that reinforced their friendship would’ve been nice.

The topic discussed in this book is one that is so important and I really enjoyed seeing it being discussed throughout the novel. There’s a huge disparity in the number of men in the tech field vs the number of women in the tech field and Screen Queens did an excellent job in exploring the difficulties that these women face. It was so frustrating to see how the women in this book were treated and its just so disheartening to think that such discrimination still occurs ion the work force . I also really appreciated the fact that they pointed out how it’s even more difficult when you’re a WOC. In so many books like these, we a see a lot of white feminism and very little intersectional feminism, so this small ad and the fact that there was some PoC protagonist made me appreciate the book even more.

Have You Read Screen Queens? Do You Want To? Let Me Know in the Comments Down Below.

 

 

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The Exact Opposite of Okay by Laura Steven Blog Tour ( Review+Blog Tour)

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Goodreads Summary:

Eighteen-year-old Izzy O’Neill knows exactly who she is—a loyal friend, an aspiring comedian, and a person who believes that milk shakes and Reese’s peanut butter cups are major food groups. But after she’s caught in a compromising position with the son of a politician, it seems like everyone around her is eager to give her a new label: slut.
Izzy is certain that the whole thing will blow over and she can get back to worrying about how she doesn’t reciprocate her best friend Danny’s feelings for her and wondering how she is ever going to find a way out of their small town. Only it doesn’t.
And while she’s used to laughing her way out of any situation, as she finds herself first the center of high school gossip and then in the middle of a national scandal, it’s hard even for her to find humor in the situation.
Izzy may be determined not to let anyone else define who she is, but that proves easier said than done when it seems like everyone has something to say about her.
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June 5th

June 6th

The Night Faerie – Review + Favourite Quotes
Book-Keeping – Review
A Dream Within A Dream – Promotional Post
Pages and Pugs – Promotional Post

June 7th

TBR and Beyond – Review + Playlist + Favourite Quotes
Staircase Wit – Review + Favourite Quotes
Luchia Houghton Blog – Promotional Post

June 8th

Kait Plus Books – Review + Favourite Quotes
Maddie.TV – Review
Confessions of a YA Reader – Promotional Post
My Bookish Escapades – Promotional Post

June 9th

Bookish_Kali – Review + Favourite Quotes
Little voids – Review
Literary Meanderings – Promotional Post

June 10th

Jill’s Book Blog – Review
Twilight Reader – Review
The Reading Life – Promotional Post

June 11th

Belle’s Archive – Review
The YA Obsessed – Review
BookCrushin – Promotional Post
My Rating: 4/ 5 stars
Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
My Thoughts
This is such an important book. I’ve read many feminist books and while some of them have been really great, there always seems to be a struggle to balance tackling these complicated issues while also maintaining a coherent and solid plot. The Exact Opposite of Okay discusses so many pertinent issues while still having a well crafted plot and strong characters. The discussion of these feminist issues felt very natural which is really important when reading a book like this. This book had so many amazing points and it was done in such an eloquent manner. It’s an incredibly timely book that can be used as a starting point for discussion on multiple relevant issues.
One of the things that made this book so unique was the main character, Izzy.  Her humor and view of the world made everything that she went through all the more interesting. She was strong, stuck to her beliefs and didn’t let anyone define who she was. She was such an amazingly strong character and incredibly confident in who she was as a person. These personality traits made the moments where she was very vulnerable and close to breaking down all the more powerful.
As I previously stated, so many important topics were discussed in this book. These subjects include slutshaming, consent, “nice” guys” and revenge porn. I absolutely loved reading about Izzy’s view on all these topics and felt that the way they were approached was very tactful and it was seamlessly woven into the plot. It was also really interesting because not only did she have to deal with shit from strangers but also from people who she genuinely cared about.  I really liked how she grappled with these betrayals.
In addition to an amazing main character, there was some really great side characters. I loved Izzy’s grandmother. She was so funny and it was so sweet how supportive she was of Izzy. I also really appreciated the fact that they were struggling as poverty rep in YA is still very limited. I also really loved Ajita’s character arc. I really hope we get to see more of her in the sequel. One thing that kind of rubbed me in the wrong way was that Izzy accidentally outs Ajita which didn’t really seem essential to the plot. I personally could have done without the forced outing. Nonetheless, I think it did show how flawed Izzy was which I think is pretty important. I just wish that there was a less harmful way to demonstrate that.
Giveaway (US ONLY)
Starts: 5th June 2019
Ends: 19th June 2019